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Birth of Faber Stapulensis

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Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples (Faber Stapulensis)

Along with Erasmus of Rotterdam and the Italian cardinal Gasparo Contarini, Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples is one of the more notable sixteenth-century humanist reformers that did not join the Protestant Reformation, but instead remained in communion with Rome. Like Erasmus and … Continue reading

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Martin Bucer

While not as recognizable as contemporaries Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, or even Philipp Melanchthon, Martin Bucer’s influential role in the early Protestant Reformation may only stand behind that of Luther himself. As a parish pastor, reformer, diplomat, preacher, … Continue reading

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Desiderius Erasmus

Few figures were as resistant to categorization during the years of the Protestant Reformation as Desiderius Erasmus. He was a staunch critic of church abuses, an advocate for humanism, and a prominent exponent of biblical criticism cited by Protestants and … Continue reading

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Birth of Martin Bucer

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Birth of Desiderius Erasmus

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“Address to the German Nobility”

Luther’s Address to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation was his call for the active involvement of secular authorities in reforming the German church. At first glance it seems like a revolutionary plea, but in fact it was a … Continue reading

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“The Bondage of the Will”

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“Prelude on the Babylonian Captivity of the Church”

At the end of his German treatise, Address to the Christian Nobility (An den christlichen Adel deutscher Nation), Luther dropped a hint of what was coming next: “I know another little song about Rome and the Romanists. If their ears … Continue reading

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